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President’s Day Weekend March and Rally in Dallas

The President’s Day Weekend March and Rally in support of all immigrants drew a large crowd at City Hall in Dallas on Saturday morning.  According to the Facebook page created for the event, the march was organized in opposition to the “selective ban on immigrants and refugees trying to obtain legal entry and safe asylum in the U.S.”

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The turn-out was diverse and peaceful.  Among the most popular chants were :  “Love, not hate, that’s what makes America great”; “Hands too small, can’t build a wall”; and “No hate, no fear, immigrants are welcome here.”  A few participants with garbage bags picked up litter along the route.

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Protest

By Karen Petree
I don’t really take part in protests, probably for the same reasons I refuse to do the wave at ball games. I love them though. I love being there as an observer, the way it feels when a huge mass of people come together with a common energy. It’s kind of like a rock concert for those of us fascinated by politics.

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In the Shadow of the Confederate Flag

By Karen Petree

The Confederate Flag is an undeniable part of my heritage. It’s one of the six flags that have flown over my home state of Texas, where I sit to write this. It waves over theme parks I visited as a child, and the more well-known battle flag peppers old cemeteries where fallen soldiers rest. Under the shadow of this flag is a part of my heritage I once ignored or overlooked. Under the shadow of this flag I’ve locked my doors at red lights or moved to the other side of the street. Under the shadow of this flag, I’ve averted my eyes and feigned an uncomfortable obliviousness to racial euphemisms. Under the shadow of this flag, I’ve avoided close relationships with African-Americans, discomforted by the glare of privilege their observable experience mirrored back at my whiteness.

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Stay Safe on Facebook

I get Facebook friend requests a lot from people I’m already friends with. The victims of these so-called “hackers” are usually older people. We call them “hackers,” but a lot of them aren’t actually hackers. They don’t take over your profile, they just try to copy what they can see. These jerks often target older people for the same reason as those guys who show up at your door and tell you (to your complete surprise) that you badly need a new roof. They assure you they’ll give you a great deal, but then they disappear with your money. These jerks assume that older people know less about social media than younger people, so they make easier targets. It’s really frustrating.

To understand what they are doing and why, it helps to know a few things about Facebook. Regardless of your privacy settings, your name and profile picture (if you have one) are totally visible to the public. Your profile picture can be easily downloaded from your profile, and then uploaded onto a new profile that one of these jerks created. So now, they have your name, and they have a picture of you. That fact itself is not really a big deal. The problem is that your friends list is probably visible to them, too. After these jerks copy your profile, they send messages to your friends, maybe to ask them for money or to get access to their profiles and personal information. Making sure your friends list is private will protect you and your friends.  The PDF below has step by step instructions.

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Kenyan Animals

All images taken in Kenya.  You can buy prints here.